Geese Suspected in Tragic Medical Helicopter Crash

In a tragic accident near Hydro, Oklahoma, three individuals lost their lives in a medical helicopter crash. The National Transportation Safety Board’s preliminary report suggests that geese may have been the cause. The helicopter, operated by Air Evac Lifeteam, was on its way back to base after transporting a patient to Oklahoma City when it crashed, resulting in the loss of pilot Russell Haslam, flight nurse Adam Tebben, and flight paramedic Steven Fitzgerald.

The investigation conducted by the NTSB and the Federal Aviation Administration revealed a significant clue at the crash site. Amongst the debris, the carcasses of several geese were found, with one even embedded in a flight control servo. This discovery prompted the NTSB to recover feathers from the geese in order to further identify the species involved.

Interestingly, a review of the US Air Force’s Avian Hazard Advisory System suggested that there was a relatively low possibility of bird activity in the area at the time of the accident. This raises questions about the presence of the geese and how their interaction with the helicopter led to such a tragic outcome.

It is devastating to lose three dedicated professionals who were committed to saving lives. The Air Evac Lifeteam expressed their heartbreak in a statement, emphasizing their cooperation with local law enforcement agencies during the search and recovery efforts.

This incident serves as a reminder of the potential hazards that can arise from wildlife encounters during aviation operations. While measures are in place to mitigate such risks, further investigation is necessary to understand how this tragic accident occurred despite low bird activity in the vicinity.

Our thoughts are with the families and loved ones of the victims, as well as the entire Air Evac Lifeteam community, as they mourn the loss of their colleagues and continue to provide life-saving services to those in need.

An FAQ section based on the main topics and information presented in the article:

Q: What happened in the tragic accident near Hydro, Oklahoma?
A: Three individuals lost their lives in a medical helicopter crash operated by Air Evac Lifeteam.

Q: What is the preliminary cause of the helicopter crash?
A: The National Transportation Safety Board’s preliminary report suggests that geese may have been the cause.

Q: What clue was found at the crash site?
A: Amongst the debris, several geese carcasses were found, with one even embedded in a flight control servo.

Q: What did the investigation reveal about bird activity in the area?
A: A review of the US Air Force’s Avian Hazard Advisory System suggested that there was a relatively low possibility of bird activity in the area at the time of the accident.

Q: What is being done to further identify the species of the geese involved?
A: The NTSB recovered feathers from the geese to further identify the species.

Q: What is the response from Air Evac Lifeteam?
A: Air Evac Lifeteam expressed their heartbreak in a statement and emphasized their cooperation with local law enforcement agencies during the search and recovery efforts.

Q: What does this incident highlight regarding wildlife encounters during aviation operations?
A: This incident serves as a reminder of the potential hazards that can arise from wildlife encounters during aviation operations, despite measures in place to mitigate such risks.

Definitions for key terms or jargon used within the article:

1. NTSB: National Transportation Safety Board – a U.S. government agency responsible for investigating accidents in various transportation sectors, including aviation.
2. FAA: Federal Aviation Administration – a U.S. government agency responsible for regulating and overseeing civil aviation.
3. Flight control servo: A mechanical actuator that controls the movement of flight control surfaces on an aircraft.
4. Avian Hazard Advisory System: A system used by the US Air Force to assess and mitigate the risks posed by bird activity to aviation operations.

Suggested related links:
National Transportation Safety Board
Federal Aviation Administration